Habana, Cuba part 3 … ” A Day in the Life “

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It’s just over 2 weeks since I’ve been home and my days in Cuba are melding together.  We experienced so much that it will be hard to squeeze it all in. Being this was a photography workshop we were scheduled with many different types of shoots.  Muench Workshops hired models for a shoot on the beach, actors for a shoot in an old building, a Children’s Dance Troup, and a young adult choir.  These sessions were amazing, but a bust for me, I only managed to capture a few good shots, and those are the ones you’re gonna see.

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.( click on images for better viewing)

Our actors shoot was set in and around a ‘typical’ old building. It was the same building where we were to have dinner.  The restaurant ‘La Guardia’ was on the top floor, and one of the best ‘paladors’ on the Island.  Let me show you the interior of this once magnificent space, imagine the beauty that was.

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The hanging laundry belongs to the palador, they are wash cloths. The two rooms shown below are just down the hall from the restaurant, some one, two, three or more live there.

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… and a view from the roof top.   untitled-269-2-Edit

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As I said earlier, the food in Cuba was delicious, however the Cuban people do not eat as the tourists do.  One of the restaurants where we dined served us enough food for  25 people.  I was shocked to see such a waste, especially when the island is hungry.  I asked the waitress what happens with all of our left overs, she replied that they feed their dogs. I couldn’t let this go and have come to the conclusion that, when possible, they are able to help feed the people in their village.

Another time, of which I am guilty of, a few  ‘Cuban’ sandwich’s were left partially uneaten and were to be taken away.  I watched, with embarrassment, the look on the waiters face. He kept shaking his head in bewilderment as he left the room.

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Cuban music has its principal roots in Spain and West Africa, but over time has been influenced by diverse genres from different countries. Most important among these are France, the United States, and Jamaica.  I wanted to give a small history lesson of their music, but that would never end, however I do know that the two main instruments played in Cuban music are the bongo’s and the guitars.  We only flirted with their sound, by the end of the day, after a full meal and a couple Bucaneros, we were spent … my only regret.

Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city in Cuba and home to many members of the Buena Vista Social Club. In fact Santiago is home to Desi Arnez, a Cuban-born American musician, actor and television producer, better known as Ricky Ricardo.  History claims that the Cuban sound started in this city. Santiago de Cuba lies 540 miles south east of Habana, or a 10 hour drive….  Next time,  yes, next time!

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 …  next stop Cienfuegos and Trinidad

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7 thoughts on “Habana, Cuba part 3 … ” A Day in the Life “

  1. Next time take me with you! Seriously! And you are right. The photos that are set up aren’t your thing, pretty as they are. You’re a street photographer. An in the moment Mama! Each of those is so beautifully framed and filled with so much emotion. Bravo! Now, TAKE ME WITH YOU NEXT TIME!

  2. Thanks so much for sharing those great shots! Your blog accompanies the compositions very well. I’m so proud of you!

  3. Mitch-These are incredible photos. You have really captured the look and feel of Cuba. Can’t wait for the next post!

  4. IF there is one thing evident from the photos (beautiful though they are), is that anyone who thinks communism is a good idea is a complete IDIOT. The ravages of that corrupt and abusive political system are stunningly evident. Tell Chevy Chase and those other goofs who admire Cuba to go stick it!

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